The reason behind Fatigues Clothesline choosing to turn uniforms inside out

There are few reasons why I chose for those who participate in Fatigues Clothesline by expressing art on an inside out military uniform blouse. One of those reasons I want to begin with is “Pride”. I remember a time before I started advocating how I hated the Marine Corps, how I regret signing up because of what I experienced. After all my very brothers raped me, took my rights away by threatening my life from reporting it, having to put up with being harassed, discriminated against because I am a woman serving in a man’s world along with being assaulted again and again… I hated the Corps.

But one day I decided not to hate the Corps. I started remembering how graduation felt after basic, the amount of pride, hard work and dedication it took for me to survive. I mean, there were others who dropped because they couldn’t handle the amount of training we had to endure or couldn’t pass a particular obstacle due to them not being able to overcome their fear. But I did, even with an injury to my right knee I persevered by not only graduating out of basic but also graduating from the wounded warrior platoon. I had to spend an extra two months at basic for physical therapy so I could strengthen my right knee and continue on. That’s right folks, I was not only in boot camp for 3 months, I was there for 5 months. Talk about hell, but I was determined to make it.

I remember the amount of pride I had marching across the parade deck with everyone who was graduating that day. We could feel relief, our anticipation growing to what is to come, how excited we were by showing off to our family how the Corps transformed us. For the woman who graduated that day, we were no longer little girls anymore; we became woman warriors by replacing our stilettos for combat boots. We were all proud that day, we earned the title Marine.

I also remembered how my second unit, the amount of respect the commander at that unit held for all Marines. There were no such thing as women or men, we were all Marines in his eyes and expected us to act accordingly. That unit became my family and brought back the love of the Corps into my heart. However, after I left the Corps I started to experience my symptoms of PTSD. How I missed the Corps and how I started hating it at the same time. I started having nightmares, I started to become agitated, anxiety hit and I couldn’t slow down. I blamed the Corps for how I acted which lead me to eventually hating it all together.

The reason why I gave you my background as to why I started hating the Corps, I have noticed some survivors of military sexual trauma and those who gone to combat eventually started hating the branch they served. I understand why they would feel this way but I just couldn’t go along with it. It pained me to hate the Corps for what I thought the Corps did to me and to see others hating their branch and by not acknowledging they have served due to the trauma they endured, I felt by them hating took from their self-esteem. I mean, this is a part of our lives that helped transform us into who we are today. A part of our lives we will never forget. So I asked myself, how can I bring the pride of serving back into these people’s lives? For starters I didn’t want anybody to draw or paint on the outside of our uniforms. Instead I wanted them to turn them inside out. I wanted this because the amount of pride we all took in taking care of our uniforms by ironing, IPing (removing or burning lose strings on the uniform) and making them ready for inspection and by looking professional for work no matter what our job entailed. We made our uniform look good and therefore we took pride in wearing our uniform no matter what trauma we endured, we looked good. Now, hating the branch we served because they failed us I feel is wrong. It is not the institution that failed us. It is the individuals who run the institution. By saying I hate Corps, I am implying I hate everyone in the Corps when there are those who served do due right by brining justice to those who were wronged. Just because we have a few bad apples in the branch we served in shouldn’t take away the pride we had for accomplishing something only a few are able to accomplish. I believe when we hate the institution we are giving power to those who wronged us. I believe we should reclaim our pride and demand action so future leaders have a positive experience in which ever branch they chose to serve in.

Today I walk around and tell everyone I am a Marine Veteran. I had a few who told me they never met a woman Marine, my response, “The Fewer, The Prouder” if I could do it all over again I would minus the trauma and getting out but to retire. I love the Corps, it helped shape me who I am today. I do not hate it anymore I just wished laws were being followed and regardless of the gender we all were treated equally. But it wasn’t that way when I was in. My wish, for our future to have a better outcome if any had to endure what I’ve gone through…

We should never lose pride from serving our nation. We should always be proud, not everyone can do what we have done and for that I want to say to those who have experienced military sexual trauma and who have gone through combat that ended up hating their branch of service, Thank You for serving. Despite everything we endured we are a much stronger and wiser person today because of it.

When we express our art on the inside out of the uniform, the paint or marking seep through and we cannot help it. This is my symbolic reason why I chose to express this way, when the expression of art bleeds through it is to acknowledge how PTSD affects us.

I do not use white t-shirts for this reason. I much rather use our uniforms, to help spread the word how the military is handling trauma. When utilizing uniforms we are singling out how the military needs to improve their mental health and judicial system at the same time, I want to empower our survivors by allowing them to be heard discreetly. This is the reason why I chose for Fatigues Clothesline to utilize inside out uniforms by expressing their trauma through art.

 

Advertisements

Fatigues Clothesline Art Therapy Workshop

Art Therapy Workshop
Friday, May 16, 2014 6-8pm

Christian Evers Elementary
School Cafeteria
1715 Richland Hills Dr.
San Antonio, TX 78251

Creative Arts Therapist, Salina Loriaux will offer a safe and confidential place from Military Sexual Trauma (MST) survivors to express their trauma through the creative arts using an inside-out military uniform top. Uniform tops completed in this workshop will be displayed at a South Texas Art Therapy Association (STATA) art show for Veterans and MST survivors healing through Art Therapy.

Salina is proud to have Regina Vasquez, founder of Fatigues Clothesline, advocate and fellow MST survivor to share her expertise and work to address this issue.

All military tops will be hung in complete confidentiality while allowing the story of each survivor to be heard. Feel free to bring in your own military top while some will be provided at the workshop.

Fatigues Clothesline is back and better than ever!

Fatigues Clothesline is back and better than ever. I urge those of you who want to bring FC to your area to contact me so we can plan an event. As a reminder, I have custody arrangements which needs to be taken into great consideration. All I ask, before creating an event to please contact me first so we can plan around my children’s time with me. I have them every other week. I am here to not only help those on their journey of healing but to help empower survivors by sharing my daily struggles with PTSD due to MST. I’m looking forward to starting workshops again. The uniforms in which our survivors create art upon will be displayed at events to help educate our community, raise awareness on our cause and to empower our survivors by being heard. I also want to ask to help spread this message so others who want FC to come to their area can contact me. Thank you in advance. Semper Fi ~ Regina / USMC Veteran / Founder and Director of Fatigues Clothesline

To reach me by email, please go to the tab that reads Contact FC. Thank you

Urge the Senate to Pass the Military Justice Improvement Act (MJIA)

Urge the Senate to Pass the Military Justice Improvement Act

We want this outreach campaign to accomplish two objectives: 1) Increase public education on military sexual assault and the importance of MJIA. 2) Encourage Congress to support MJIA.
Background:
Last year, an anonymous Department of Defense survey indicated that 26,000 cases of unwanted sexual contact occurred during 2012. Yet only 3,374 cases of sexual assault were reported.
o 62% of victims who reported sexual assault experienced retaliation.
o Of the 67% of women who experienced unwanted sexual contact but did not report, 47% said fear of retaliation or reprisal prevented them from reporting.
o 43% heard about negative experiences from other victims who had reported.
o 50% thought nothing would be done.

Strong action is required to restore service members’ faith and confidence in the military justice system. Despite two decades of sexual assault scandals that include Tailhook (1991), Aberdeen (1996), the Air Force Academy (2003) and Lackland (2012), no significant progress has been made in ending sexual assault in the ranks.
o Our military is rooted in an obsolete, 18th century justice system in which commanders, instead of highly trained military legal personnel, administer justice.
o Because the commander making these decisions is in the accused’s chain of command, military justice suffers from inherent bias.
What the Military Justice Improvement Act Does:
The Military Justice Improvement Act reassigns the convening authority powers for serious crimes to an experienced, impartial military prosecutor. The change applies to all serious crimes that can be punished with more than one year of confinement except for crimes specific to the military, such as a failure to obey a lawful order.

For more information on MJIA, visit http://bit.ly/Vets4MJIA

On behalf of Fatigues Clothesline

I am posting guest book comments from my old FC website so they will forever be heard and remembered.  Thank you for your continued support.

Jamie said on Mar 5, 2013 11:52 AM
I was sexually assaulted four years ago, the “anniversary” date is coming up in 16 days. I’m still in the service for a little while longer. I am getting a medical board right now, hoping to get a medical retirement so I can have a little bit of income. My perpetrator was someone I did not know until the night he sexually assaulted me. He and I were with another friend of ours, my friend had tried to warn me about “SARC.” I thought he was joking because that’s what we did in tech school was joke. I blame myself on a daily basis because I didn’t take it seriously. I wish I did. I am in counseling, have medications, but I still have panic attacks, depression, PTSD, social anxiety disorder, even a little bit of borderline personality disorder due to harming myself. I have so much anger, that I have spewed it towards my chain. I was in front of my supervisor and first shirt after a meeting with my commander for my fourth PT failure. I started cussing, crying, while being completely numb through the entire process. I had given up, I didn’t care about anything. I still have moments like that. It’s not an easy battle, and no, I don’t have to get over it as soon as possible. I will have my own setbacks. My supervisor has been awesome with my situation, not. I have a ton of anger towards them as well…


said on Apr 22, 2012 0:07 AM
Nov 2004 I had my confidence self esteem and self worth taken from me. I was active duty was at the training facility went out with friends and was drugged and raped. One of the friends who saw it punched a window out. I was taken in by the MP’s who questioned me and i had no memory of the next day. during that time they never offered a rape kit. Not til the monday when i returned for training to tell my instructor what happened was i finally asked if i had a rape kit done (thankfully his wife who was a nurse asked if i had one). 3 days after the attack i was told I was raped. i had bruises on my arms (actual finger prints) from where i was held down. after that i was told the suspect had put a MPs head thru a wall and went AWOL. Was I treated accordingly no I was put on24 hour watch in a room with a guard. When they found him then they returned him to the barricks til out prosessing. His room was right below mine. The miltary told me well we gave u a no contact order. So instead i saw him in chow walking around the base the person who took everything from got to smile at me everyday for the month they took to out process. I began drinkiing heavily to numb my pain and bc of the anger i felt. I went to psych after psych no one could help they were trying to take away my anger that i used to get thru the day. The miltary shipped me to my first duty station with a alcohol situation bc i was under age. well the drinking got worse two years after the incident I found out he had not beencourt martialed andwas still actve duty. I lost it i went out and got seriously intoxicated i mean how can he still be cashing the same paycheck as me and not had any reprocussions. Well i got in trouble again finally i was diagnosed with PTSD. if you are diagnosed with alcoholism u are made to seek help. But PTSD no thats swept under the rug. I got out in 2008 and became a police officer still drank and made carless decisions and never got attached to anyone. I started having panic attacks after i had to make a emergency call for a rape. I saw the same void in her eyes i knew so well. It was all down hill there again, 3 months of spiraling out of control i finally sought help thruthe VA and am trying to deal with it everyday. The reason i never finished therapy was bc I thought what if it doesn’t work, if i never finished i still had that hope it would. So we will find out


Kimberly said on Apr 3, 2012 6:54 AM
Hi – I would like to participate in this. I too am an MST victim. I would love to send you my blouse.Can you please tell me how. Thank you for bringing this awareness out. Kimberly


Terry (Hopkins) Haverty said on Dec 26, 2011 4:52 PM
As with the rest of my military sisters here, I too just recently have been diagnosed with M.S.T. And had been sexually asulted, harrassed, belittled, rumored about, apporched for prostitution, and received and “Honorable” with the reason “Unable to adapt to Military Life”. I really had to laugh on that one because I am a daughter of a 22 year Army Career Vet. I was born and raised. Though I was Air Force. I was active for 2 years and it did not end until I was discharched 11 months after I had gotten out of Basic Training. I was just 18 when I went in and just over 19 when I got out. Trying to tell people the reason and not have them laugh is embarassment enough but to this day my family does not know and I don’t know if I will ever tell them, either. I am now seeking counsling, Praise the Lord. All these years I had thought that I had dealt with the trauma by having children, grandchildren, friends, and life that kept me busy from having to face the reality that still “HAD” me everyday. That assisted in 2 divorces and the moving away from all of those things that had be distracted, to where I am today, Alone and “HAVING TO DEAL”. And wow what a mess. I know have a Companion Cat and praying about getting a Service Dog for my panic attacks, sleepless nights, and “Stranger Danger” moments. I have 2 beautiful daughters, a son, a granddaughter and 2 grandsons that I have had to teach from a VERY young age about “STRANGER DANGER”, Safe words, and no secrets because secerts can hurt”. I have been told that I have been overly protective of my children, grandchildren, my friends, and their children. I have been divorced 11 years and have not had sexual relationship with a man in 13 years. So like all of you it has effected my life horribly and now I have to deal and wow is it freaky. As with time I will “DEAL” and “HEAL”. As of today I do not know of a group where I am at. Though I do pray that I find one. So that I can be active and supportive. Thank you for your support. And I will be praying for you and all that are here and those that will joining.


Nicole said on Oct 20, 2011 1:35 PM
I had been in the Army for 2 1/2 years and then was sent to Germany to work at Landstuhl Hospital. I only made it 3 weeks before I was drugged and raped. I only remember bits and pieces of the actual incident but I do remember him carrying me through the barracks naked and then throwing me on mt bed. I could handle that. But then 3 weeks later, I was raped again and then left on the street bruised and hungover. When I made it back to my barracks, a friend stopped by, one that I trusted, and I told him what happened… and then he raped me… that was enough to push me over the edge and I spent a month on the psych ward. After that, I didn’t care about the Army, or the uniform I was wearing…. I just wanted to curl up and die. So I stopped going in to work. Stopped answering my phone, and was almost given an Article 15 before I finally spoke up. My commander (a female) told me that it all had to be my fault. Afterall, who gets raped 3 times by 3 different men on 3 seperate occassions without cause? I spent another 2 weeks in the psych ward. I was then given an honorable discharge (because they said a medical discharge could take 6-9 months to process, so I took the quick way home), but had to be babysat for my entire out-processing because I was on a suicide watch. When being dropped off at the airport, I was told by my squad leader that I could stop faking now because I was going home… that almost hurt more than the actual rapes… I am still trying to handle my emotions, which seem to get the best of me quite often, but I have been seeing an MST councelor at my local VA since getting out. I fear that this will never go away… I am scared to go out by myself, scared to have a drink at the bar with a friend, scared of my own shadow sometimes…. but I know I’ll make it through this valley at some point. This all happened in 2009 and I am currently living in Columbia, SC. If anyone knows of a way for me to bring this Fatiges Clothesline to my state, please let me know!!!


Jessica said on Oct 20, 2011 8:58 AM
Hi there… I would like to participate in this… I am an MST victim. I would love to send you my blouse.. Please tell me how. Thanks Jessica


Pat Gregory said on Apr 25, 2011 9:16 PM
Carolynn, I miss Irish everyday too. Miss you


Kristi said on Apr 12, 2011 7:23 PM
I’m a former service member, and my encounters with sexual violence and harassment are all secondary. However, asa former military member, I feel heartbroken and empathetic towards those women who were victimized by their so-called brothers in arms. What a great program, Regina, a powerful statement is made as each of these fatigue blouses are turned into a personalized statement of what each victim has gone through. I love it. To all of you who were victimized, never give up. Keep trying to get your voice heard, even if you are discharged, don’t give up!


Carolynn Favreau said on Apr 6, 2011 4:11 PM
I too suffered from MST/PTSD but that wasn’t even the worse thing about it. I wanted to remain in the Army and have a career but that was taken away from me. I was literally kicked out because I refused to keep my mouth shut about what happened. It never got put in my records but enstead they discharged be “Honorably” with the reason “Unsuitable for military service”. Well an honorable discharge under those circumstances sent up red flags all over the place but nobody would pay attention. Everyone else who was discharged got a “General Discharge Under Honorable Conditions”. I fought 42 years before I finally found somebody in the VA who read between the lines. I spent a week in the hospital after my attack but everything but the rape was put in my records. The doctor I seen for my C&P actually said the circumstances that put in the Army hospital as an inpatient could only be sustained from a forceable rape. Well, I now can hold my head up and say “I couldn’t remain in the Army but it wasn’t my fault”. I now get 100% service connected but I say I paid more than my dues to get there. I filled and kept getting denied because of various reasons but finally was introduced to Captain Agnes “Irish” Bresnahan and she helped me fight the system for the last time and win. God Bless her and I owe her so much. I miss her dearly too as she was my rock and I could talk to her anytime. I don’t have the luxury any more. I wish the US Government would eraticate the MST from all branches of the military because it is not right. I was denied my life, my respect and my military career because of a jerk who thought he was superior to me. Lord only knows who elses life he destroyed. I don’t know what else I can say except we need to keep fighting and showing we are not going to take it anymore.


 

Tracey F. Drazenovich said on Nov 10, 2013 11:54 AM
I am so happy that this site is here, so many times I feel like a “Drama Queen” but as time passes I see how my life has been affected by the military and sexual trauma, I continue to heal and pray for other sisters!


Heartbroken said on Jun 6, 2013 8:33 AM
An amazing website. Thank you! While not in the military myself, I have lived through some of the same traumas. It would be great to see reviews of books like “Why Does He DO That?” by Lundy Bancroft and any books by Patricia Evans on the topic. And, Regina, your photography is magical! Each and every one of them grabs the eye and invites your heart to sit down over a cup of coffee. Thanks for sharing. More! More!


Grzegorz Maciagowski said on Jun 5, 2013 7:36 AM
I’m living in Poland in Elblag. I’v been reed your texts with intresting. I’m also living struggling trauma in my life. Grzegorz (www.wiersze.p.ht)


 

casey said on Jan 23, 2013 10:28 PM
I am a navy vet who went through MST, and I was discharged as a result, tonight I will turn my blouse inside out. Thank you. I’ve felt so alone since returning to Idaho, but some how it makes me feel better knowing there are others out there and we can survive


 

Edie Davis said on Nov 9, 2012 9:04 AM
Regina is was great meeting you at the “The Invisible War” showing last night. Thank you for your courage in speaking for those who cannot. Never give up the fight! Many blessings to you and your family.


 

Melissa Jackson said on Sep 6, 2012 4:13 PM
Thanks so much for all the work! I’m a 30 year survivor and only beginning the process of getting my benefits. I don’t expect much…I’ve kept this secret and suffered with PTSD from MST alone. Again, thank you for helping those of us who have suffered for so many years! I can’t find the link to the VA form 210781A…can you help???


Patti Marin, LCSW said on May 2, 2012 1:23 PM
very inspiring. Thank you for your braveness.


Terry (Hopkins) Haverty said on Dec 26, 2011 5:06 PM
Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Jennifer Norris said on Dec 5, 2011 9:44 AM
Thanks to your courage to speak out, it gave me the courage to speak out. I will forever be grateful to those who opened this door.


djandyk said on Nov 3, 2011 8:25 PM
doing a great job keep it up your banners seem to work a treat on my website keep themthere aslond as you like djanyk adk-radio.net


andrew thomas keyes said on Oct 20, 2011 6:23 PM
thank you for all you do to help the silent sufferers..keep up the good work


morgan cooley said on Oct 13, 2011 5:09 AM
wow, i love this site. i am a female veteran and have had to deal with mst in silence but i am glad to see there is a sisterhood and i can speak out now.


Monalisa Sarin said on Sep 26, 2011 12:31 PM
Very nice lady and heart felt. I support you and all that you do. So glad you are here with us. I love the song to this. Well done sister.


Penelope McClenan1 said on Aug 22, 2011 7:54 PM
Thank You Regina, and Bravo from your comrade Penelope


ann said on Jun 20, 2011 10:32 PM
hi i just found the link to your page on another site and big thanks to you for what you are doing! i live in TN and to date, havent met any female vets @ the VA where i receive my treatment. makes me wish i was back in TX so i could participate in your programs. I am a Navy Vet who experienced MST early on and it all just went downhill from there….i am in the beginning stages of my treatment, scared to death but determined to see it thru. thank you for your service and sacrifices and for what you are doing for women like me!


Catherine said on Jun 16, 2011 7:43 PM
I entered the Air Force in 1979. I was placed in a male dominated field, law enforcement. From the day I began Tech School, I was harrassed and raped once. When I got to my duty station, I was raped 3 more times and molested once. Ironically the Sargent who molested me was the one who was prosecuted-he was forced to retire and lost rank. I wouldn’t have reported that but was caught running from the work trailer by a female Ssgt. I tried to commit suicide a month after being discharged. My life for the next 30 years was hell. Then I found the Vet Center in Orlando in 2001 where I received counseling for 10 years. Now I am in group therapy, working on remembering all that has happened to me. I receive benefits now for PTSD/MST. It will never give me back my life but it assists me in being able to work in therapy. I can finally say that I am angry in a healthy way, and not as a total victim. I am reclaiming my life at 53 years old. I won’t let them win anymore. I’m getting my life back, so I can live the rest of my life free of the criminals who took it from me. Don’t give up…there’s help out there, I am proof of it.


Sylvia Aguirre said on May 28, 2011 12:20 PM
I want all of you to know, I feel your burning, too. You all deserve the greatest parade I can Imagine, if only in my dreams. I honor all the sacrifices that you all so bravely made. The choices that all of you made for the sake of Freedom, are not forgotten. Memorial day is not only about honoring those that sacrificed their lives, but about honoring those that survived to live to tell about it. You all are the witnesses to those sacrifices. There are unseen war wounds in all of US. All of you volunteered because you believed everything-We all believed the same thing, that we were doing the right thing. But the right thing to do, is yet to come. We will all make this right. Justice for our own, all the people; Armed forces, and Civilians we are all in this together. Sempre Fi is in all of US. That faith is what will bring US all together, all branches, all people. We are one and the same, we all hurt for what we were led to believe! I salute all of my Friends, as I imagine that parade in my dreams. Long live the United States! A nation United can never be Divided!


Grace said on Apr 15, 2011 9:14 PM
I am reaching out to anybody that can help me. I was sexually assaulted in Afghanistan in 2008. We shortly returned back to our home base. Upon returning I was loaded up with medication. I tried to commit suicide by overdosing on ambien. I was hospitalized in an Italian hospital outside our base when this happened. I was given leave a month later and went AWOL. I have been AWOL every since, I have tried turning myself into two different army bases. (Sill and Hood) Each time I am told I am not AWOL an to report back to Italy. I am at a loss and need help. I just want to get this addressed as quietly as possible. I don’t care if I am given a bad discharge I just need some closure so I can start my healing process. Also, I tried my local VA and my congressman -both unsuccessful.


Maggie Torrisi said on Apr 1, 2011 4:09 AM
I entered the USAF in 1981. I was forced into a career field that had just opened up to women. “Aircraft Armament Systems Specialist” aka bomb loader. When I arrived to MacDill AFB in 1982, my first roll call in my shop it was made perfectly clear that I was not wanted there. The SMSGT announced to me that I would either be taken out in a body bag, straight jacket, or I would go AWOL and be kicked out. That women had no place there. A week after I arrived I suffered a severe head injury after being attacked at the barracks. No one was charged. Within a month after that, I was repeated raped by a supervisor in my shop and became pregnant. I was ordered to have an abortion but refused as I did not believe in abortion. I was belittled and harrassed every minute of the day. I still to this day suffer from PTSD/MST from all of this. Trying to heal but even after almost 30 years it is really hard. I gave the child up for adoption and we reunited 2 years ago. That is going well as he does not want to meet his father, (which btw nothing happened to him)but my son was born with a birth defect which I am not sure if it was due to all the stress I suffered during that time. Thank you for making people aware, this is still a hell we live.


diane, an army veteran said on Mar 25, 2011 9:53 PM
like Leona i enlisted in the US Army in 1974 went active in 1975. the all women boot camp was fine, and i was one in a handful of females in MP school.-I heard the same dialogue a woman in the service were either lesbians or whores. my own grandfather remembered a song from his air force days-“the WACS and WAVES are winning the war, so what the hell are we fighting for? after being out since 1978 the VA is finally taking my MST/PTSD seriously i have been off work since last October after being hospitalized when my flashbacks became too vivid to tolerate. Ive been in therapy and groups since and have filed a claim for compensation-like many women i never reported my rapes or sexual harrassment having been told that i was asking for it by being in “A man’s army” I was sent overseas and was the ONLY female MP in the whole country (SE Thailand) and only one of a few stationed at my camp. To say it was a hostile work environment would be an understatement. When i initially sought help i was accused of going for a Section 8, malingering, and of course being a whore. After discharge no one could understand my stress and why i do things the way i do. 32 years and 4 marraiges later im finally getting the help i desparately need. my family still doesnt understand stating “your tour in the military is what you make of it” So here i am, not working, afraid to go out alone. i sit in my apt with the blinds closed. After all the physical and verbal abuse i experienced i trust no man. anyway i still get triggered easily and am looking forward to the day that i feel whole. Thank you for this website and your support Diane USA-1974-1978, NVANG 1979-1982


lyndalee cress “Dusty” said on Mar 25, 2011 4:45 AM
You said you were looking for dog trainers for PTSD dogs. Someone I believe you should contact is “Best Friends Animal Sanctuary.com, in Kanab, Utah. They know a lot of the trainers that do this kind of work, please it might save some homeless dogs that have been trained. I too was tramatized in the military, except I was Army. If I can help you please let me know. Rest Gently Please.


Betsy Beckner said on Mar 25, 2011 0:23 AM
Regina, I am still just starting in my journey to make sense of what had happened to me while I was on active duty 1978-1988 as a Navy Corpsman. I am looking forward to using your website as a resource for both information and comfort, thank you. Betsy


Lorraine Manifold said on Mar 24, 2011 7:43 AM
Thanks Regina for all you do for women! I love these two quotes and think they are pretty pertinent to write here: ‎”As long as women are prevented from attaining their highest possibility, so long will men be unable to achieve the greatness which might be theirs.” and “In past ages humanity has been defective and inefficient because it has been incomplete. War and its ravages have blighted the world; the education of woman will be a mighty step toward its abolition and ending… In truth, she will be the greatest factor in establishing universal peace and international arbitration. Assuredly, woman will abolish warfare among mankind.” ~Abdu’l-Bahá


Carina Kagan said on Mar 4, 2011 3:37 PM
Thank you Miss Regina for your website and your ongoing push and fight to bring to light the ugliness that so many female Marines/military members have endured. You are brave and strong and as the mother of a former female Marine and now the mother of an active duty female Solider, I am VERY proud of you. Amen to what everyone has posted above, especially the user friendliness of your site. I will be making a donation and hope that others will as well. PLEASE to do not give up the fight…God Bless You and you are in my prayers.


Barbara said on Jan 6, 2011 5:05 PM
Great blog, Regina! You are doing fabulous work. Keep it up, sister!


Sandra Rucker said on Dec 12, 2010 3:30 PM
Regina, I met you by chance and I am so happy that God directed me to you. It brings tears to my eyes that I have met such an Angel. I too have experienced a lot of traumatic experiences. I attend group therapy 3x per week. I have taken my pain, just as you have and turned it into something larger than the both of us and this is giving back to Veterans, known to me as Angels. I wish you nothing less than continued success. God Bless you and God Bless our Troops who are serving and those who have given the ultimate their lives. It is up to us to not let their lives be forgotten, for they still live on in their kids and or spouses.


Maggie Torrisi said on Nov 8, 2010 7:23 AM
Thank you Regina for your efforts in the battle. I was in the USAF and was assaulted by a supervisor that lead to a baby. The AF did everything to cover it up. No one was charged with anything. I was bullied and beat down. Became an alcoholic and went from one bad relationship to another. Lost custody of my children because of the depression and here it is 28 years later still having nightmares and anxiety attacks. I stopped drinking and want to use that energy to fight to end this as well. I fear for any woman who wants to enter the military. I recently cringed when they announced they were going to allow women on submarines in the Navy. It is just asking for trouble. Keep up the good work and awareness.


A Black Rose said on Nov 7, 2010 8:07 AM
Hello from the team at A Black Rose. I just wanted to say that it is an honor to be in the fight for justice with you. Thank you for being strong and fighting for what is right. I love what you’ve done with the site. If there’s anything we can do to help, let us know!


Leona Harris said on Nov 5, 2010 10:07 PM
Good for you, Regina, to stand up like this! When I enlisted in the US Army in 1974, my friends told me only prostitutes and lesbians joined the Army. I told them I was neither, and would go and do my best to disprove them. I was assaulted by my NCOIC and gave him a black eye for his efforts. It was in front of the Sgt Maj, so we called it even. He had to explain the injury to his wife, not me… God bless you for your courage, and willingness to help our sisters in arms with this traumatic experience. I know it takes time and effort to heal and put something like this behind us. Leona, USA ’74-’79, CalNatlGuard ’79-’80


Rev Dorothy Mackey USAF Capt & Commander said on Oct 28, 2010 9:32 PM
What is the saddest is the fact our federal government is involved in military human sexual trafficking & training once good men to be rapists; as those in command leadership are equally sexually deviant. I have met more then my share of military men and women of all services who have been destroyed by these crimes. Failure of our leadership is treasonous to those who abide by all the rules. Take down the 6 immunity laws giving protection to those allowing these crimes.


Juan Manuel Reyes said on Oct 13, 2010 1:35 PM
!!!WTF!!!OVER!!! I have been an active duty Marine from 1986-1991, and I have never been so disgusted as to somethings Marines are capable of!!! We as Marines must take care of each other weather male or female, we are all Marines first and foremost. I was very moved as I read your inside out blouse. It really hurt me because I was in denial as to what had happened. I am here just to understand, learn, and provide some sort of reverence. I have always respected my fellow Marines, and I am incline to teach those values to my children I have two beautiful girls and one hard headed son. I love them so. I am sorry for the pain caused by some imbeciles, who have total disregard of what we stand for. I hope those involved got the full punishment under the law. Semper Fi


laura tattoo said on Oct 11, 2010 11:30 AM
regina, your website looks so fantastic, so informative and well organized. your writing is great! can’t tell you how proud you’ve made me feel today: i’m a BIG fan. thank you for everything you are doing. xoxoxoxooxxo


Vernon Davis said on Sep 28, 2010 3:05 AM
We will fight this war together as united front.


KATHLEEN BOYD said on Sep 23, 2010 12:40 PM
Thank you for all that you are doing to educate the world of our plight. You are a lady of great courage and conviction. God bless you always. Kathleen, WAC, 1974-1975, USAR 1984-89


Lori Gholson said on Sep 18, 2010 10:21 AM
Thank you for all your hard work and for letting us tell our stories.


Rev. James Koshu Alonzo, Natl Viet Nam Veterand Ministers said on Sep 16, 2010 11:22 AM
I am very sorry to hear of this MST. When I was in the army in viet mam I did not know of this happening. But for what it is worth, I do specialize in counseling, ptsd at no charge, with a Buddhist perspective. May you and yours be well and in harmony.


Desiree Forbes said on Sep 12, 2010 7:18 PM
Hi there and I commend you for your courage and great strength through your dark time. You may just save an other woman from many issues with your message. I would love to help in anyway I can. Please contact me if you have time. (ps my son may enter the Navy in 2 yrs~very scary)


BOB FORD said on Sep 10, 2010 6:10 AM
I am very happy this ugly issue has been brought out of the shadows and into the light. I am proud to add my name in support. I admire your courage. Stay safe, Sister.


Renee Weimer said on Sep 2, 2010 8:47 PM
Thank you for starting this. Renee USMC ’88 – ’92


Lorraine “Doc Corso” said on Sep 1, 2010 2:48 AM
I am so glad you sent me a friend request! I admire what you are doing and I stand with you as I have been there too.


Andrea said on Aug 28, 2010 1:52 PM
I have shared this link with my MST group on the IAVA Community of Veterans website.


Mary said on Aug 10, 2010 7:55 PM
Thank you for your tremendous strength and courage. I work with veterans with PTSD, some who have experienced MST, and will share your website with them.


Susan Frye said on Aug 10, 2010 1:24 PM
I’m a PTSD sufferer from rape/sodomy @ the age of 18…I never spoke of it, until I was 32. It really messed me up, because unlike YOU, where you shoulda been safe from this, I felt I put myself in a sketchy position, so therefor, I “Felt” I deserved it…But AFTER talking about it and counseling,,,I NOW KNOW BETTER!!!… I love and respect what you are doing here and have my support 100%.. Susan


bill perry said on Aug 8, 2010 10:50 AM
Such a compelling story, and brilliant outreach method, & demo Your website will be a very integral part of Sisters (& Brothers) restoring “some” of the Quality of Life that has been stolen from them Bill Perry, Service Officer Disabled American Veteran CSO Make ANY ERROR in the VA Claims maze, & you’ll be forced into a 2 year Appeal process Get Expert Advice, Evaluations, & Treatment 215.945.1269 215.945.3350


Fred Foster said on Aug 8, 2010 9:30 AM
Thank for your service and message. I served our beloved Corps from 69 to 79, and during that time witnessed so much of waht you speak of. During my time WM’s were 1 of 2 things whores or lesbians. I’m ashamed of the way they were treated and in my opinion those that abused you were not Marines. Nor were they men. Respect of anyone that wore the uniform regardless of sex is what I was taught by my parents and in boot. Your speaking out about this is a start to the resolution of this disgrace that has plagued my Corps for far to long. It takes a strong women to be a Marine and a stronger one to stand up and fight for justice. Do as the Corps taught you fight for what is right and Honorable. I for one stand with you, Semper Fi and God Bless the Marines.


Wendi said on Aug 4, 2010 9:46 AM
What a powerful message. Thanks for all you are doing do help Vets. For anyone who needs help with their claims, come to http://www.straighttalkforveterans.com. I moderate there and we have attorneys, advocates, VSOs, VA Employees, seasoned Vets and others willing to assist you free of charge. MST is difficult to prove but we may be able to assist you.


Sophia said on Aug 3, 2010 4:29 PM
Thank you for your courage! I am so sorry that you have had to endure such trauma. You sound like an amazingly strong woman. I am sure your project is going to help many people. Thank you again.


Shelley “Mouse” Collins said on Aug 2, 2010 3:33 PM
Wow! I feel really stupid right now. I am the wife of a Vietnam vet who suffers from other disorders related to war but never knew after all these years that MST even existed! I am a survivor of sexual abuse not related to war and never have put the two together in the same sentence. It just didn’t enter my mind! Thank You for opening my eyes! I am your newest supporter! Bless all of the Servicemen and Women, then and now! ❤


Jan Flynn said on Jul 31, 2010 8:23 AM
Blessings to you for your courage and voice. I will pass on this site to the wonderful and brave women in my Women’s Group who have been sexually assaulted.


Sharon Dorsey-Smith said on Jul 31, 2010 1:56 AM
Thank you for being the voice we need. I can identify. I was raped by three men, our soldiers, while stationed in Panama in 1997. I did not address the issue until 2004. My claim has been denied twice because I did not report. No evidence. Well the evidence is still embedded inside of me. I relive it everyday. By the Grace of God, I have not used drugs and alcohol for six years. That was the only way I found to medicate my feelings and the pain and horror. I am so grateful to Facebook for, otherwise, I would not have found the support I need. I am also grateful for the MST treatment I receive on an outpatient basis at the Montrose VA. God bless you Regina and all that you do.


roy chaney said on Jul 28, 2010 1:59 PM
Iam so Proud of the Men That Had My Back in the NUM I love uall and GOD Does TOO


Dora from Twilighters said on Jul 25, 2010 10:03 AM
You are very brave and I am so sorry you had to go thru what you did while serving our country. You are making a big difference for the people who are serving now and in the future. May GOD bless you and your entire family. Thank you for all you have done and are doing. You are my hero!


Kristen said on Jul 22, 2010 10:38 PM
Regina ~ YOU are a very couragous woman. Standing with your vision and words for you and all other MST surviors/victims. I too am a survivor … and WILL be turning my BDU jacket inside out. THANK YOU ~


Debbie said on Jul 22, 2010 3:35 PM
OMG, We all know it happens but sometimes we forget with the war that this is happening while they are fighting. Thank you being brave and coming forward. I hope your project allows other to do the same. Very moving website. Thanks


Barb Funk said on Jul 22, 2010 9:17 AM
Wow! What a gracious and powerful way to get your message out. Thank you so much for your service to country and for figuring out a creative and effective way to make a difference—one more time! God Bless you and keep going! Off to post your site on my Military Mom Coping With Deployment group to help spread the word! Hugs! <3!


Dee said on Jul 22, 2010 8:02 AM
I applaud your bravery and I thank you for your service.


Chaps said on Jul 22, 2010 1:27 AM
I applaud your courage and your efforts. If I can be of any assistance please ask. Aloha *hugs* blessings love and prayers for all our service members and their families. ❤ chaps


Rhonda said on Jul 21, 2010 3:52 PM
As a veteran, I can’t thank you enough. This project is amazing!


Tere said on Jul 21, 2010 1:27 PM
I have honor and respect for every person who has experienced any sort of sexual harassment! I pray for each and everyone of you! May your voices be heard! With love and respect<3 (King Lily)


Friday said on Jul 21, 2010 8:12 AM
Thank you for your service, commitment and courage. I pray this endeavor will help the cover-ups to come to light and cease. I’m thankful all of you are here.


Lucie said on Jul 17, 2010 4:57 PM
Regina I am so very proud of you! I am so proud to call you my friend. With tears in my eyes I read your story and I applaud you for your bravery in telling it. We are a retired, disabled military family, who appreciates all that you have done and do! Hugs to you Regina! (Nessie)


Gordon Graham said on Jul 13, 2010 6:21 PM
Excited about an MST gathering here in the Seattle area. It is an issue that is not given nearly enough attention, as many of you know, but I’m doing so.


melissa said on Jul 6, 2010 6:09 PM
your courage and strength is a breath of fresh air keep up your outstanding work way to go a lot of people would just close there eyes way to go your amazing fore bringing this out


 

Debranette Anne said on Jul 4, 2010 5:22 PM
Hello lovely lady, I am impressed with what you have done here. It takes guts to stand up and say No this is not the way I will be treated. Fantastic for you to have the courage to stand back up after being knocked down. It takes strenght to do that and here you have stood up with pride and sheer guts I hope the world honors your courage because you deserve it Regads Debranette


Yolanda said on Jul 4, 2010 5:17 PM
Thank you for you website. I plan on sending my shirt foward with my story.


Lynn said on Jul 4, 2010 9:19 AM
Thank you for doing this huge project for our voices to be heard finally. I will be sending a shirt with my stories on it for the nation to read. I will let others know about what you are doing. For I was silent for way too long and no longer need to be, I will remove the tape from my mouth so you well hear my words and know what I went through while serving my country. PTSD-MST… and a Survivor.


Amando Javier said on Jul 4, 2010 7:24 AM
The fight goes on, you are brave and there are many of those who have experienced the same that are voiceless (men and women) . . . you took the bull by the horn and leading silent victims a new way to fight back. Thanks to your effort and many of us supports you. Semper Fi, Kokopelli.


Randall E. Osborne said on Jul 3, 2010 2:32 PM
I just wanted to say that I am so pleased to see this site and to know that persons will have an opportunity to express what has happened to them in a safe and healthy platform. No names (neither those who were victimized nor those who tried to make them victims). Just a place to express the hurt and pain and, hopefully, begin to heal. Pain shared is pain lessened!


Jane Conrad said on Jul 2, 2010 2:52 PM
It disgusts me that women who serve in our military are treated like this. Please know you have my respect. Bless you for your service, and for standing up for women who are MST survivors.


Alvaro Matta said on Jul 2, 2010 2:26 PM
Keep fighting Marine!


Regina said on Jul 1, 2010 10:50 PM
Testing out my new web page guest book. Hope this works.

On and Off Base Living

Attention Active Duty!!
Sexual Harassment can lead to rape!
It doesn’t matter who you are being harassed by
All Service Members who lives on and off base, especially in the barracks Must have these Items in order to protect yourself from any further injustice.


  • Security Deposit Box Located off Base – You need this to keep all materials safe and out of site.
  • A digital Recorder that can be plugged into a computer that can transfer all data onto a CD or Flash Drive
  • A Digital Camera so you can take pictures of bruises left by the perpetrator along with three copies of a written statement saying what happened.
  • CDs or a very good Flash Drive that has a lot of memory – You will need to transfer all data from the digital recorder and digital camera on to the CDs or Flash drive so you can keep the storage of both digital device free for new evidence.
  • A Journal to write in every night. – The journal is to tell what happened and how you felt during the course of the day.  It can be a notebook or a composition book. At the end of every week You must make three copies of each page and keep those in a labeled folder that says Journal just in case something happens, the copies of your journal is safe and sound.
  • Make 3 copies of each: medical records, counsel sheets and anything pertaining to you. Inform the person it is your right to have a copy of the documents but it is your responsibility to make 3 sets for you. The reason why you are making 3 copies = 1 copy for you (or family), 1 copy for your lawyer and one copy for your doctor or therapist.
  • A prepaid cell phone for emergencies.
  • Folders with Labels for each medical records, counsel sheets, and journals. It is very important to keep everything organized. I suggest you buy 3 folders that have 3 slots, again in each folder that has three slots you will have one copy for you (or family) in one slot, one copy for a lawyer in the next slot and one copy for your doctor or therapist in the last slot.